Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Posted by on Oct 8, 2018 in Hot Topics | 0 comments

We all know someone affected by Breast Cancer. Whether it is themselves, or a loved friend or family member, it is know to affect 1 in 8 women. Breast Cancer is also the second leading cause of death for women. However, this disease not only falls upon women, but it is known to develop in men, although rare. Awareness is important for everyone, because some people may come across a lump, but dismiss it. According to the World Health Organization, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, claiming the lives of hundreds of thousands of women each year and affecting countries at all levels of modernization. This disease being worldwide is the reason awareness is so important. Learning the facts and symptoms can help save lives.

 

According to nationalbreastcancer.org, genetic factors include: 

  • Gender:  Breast cancer occurs nearly 100 times more often in women than in men.
  • Age:  Two out of three women with invasive cancer are diagnosed after age 55.
  • Race:  Breast cancer is diagnosed more often in caucasian women than women of other races.
  • Family History and Genetic Factors:  If your mother, sister, father or child has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer, you have a higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer in the future. Your risk increases if your relative was diagnosed before the age of 50.
  • Personal Health History:  If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast, you have an increased risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer in the other breast in the future. Also, your risk increases if abnormal breast cells have been detected before (such as atypical hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)).
  • Menstrual and Reproductive History:  Early menstruation (before age 12), late menopause (after 55), having your first child at an older age, or never having given birth can also increase your risk for breast cancer.
  • Certain Genome Changes:  Mutations in certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can increase your risk for breast cancer. This is determined through a genetic test, which you may consider taking if you have a family history of breast cancer. Individuals with these gene mutations can pass the gene mutation onto their children.
  • Dense Breast Tissue:  Having dense breast tissue can increase your risk for breast cancer and make lumps harder to detect. Several states have passed laws requiring physicians to disclose to women if their mammogram indicates that they have dense breasts so that they are aware of this risk. Be sure to ask your physician if you have dense breasts and what the implications of  having dense breasts are.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *